PARTIAL INCOMPATIBILITY BETWEEN ANTS AND SYMBIOTIC FUNGI IN TWO SYMPATRIC SPECIES OF ACROMYRMEX LEAF‐CUTTING ANTS

@article{Bot2001PARTIALIB,
  title={PARTIAL INCOMPATIBILITY BETWEEN ANTS AND SYMBIOTIC FUNGI IN TWO SYMPATRIC SPECIES OF ACROMYRMEX LEAF‐CUTTING ANTS},
  author={Adriane N. M. Bot and Stephen A Rehner and Jacobus J. Boomsma},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2001},
  volume={55}
}
Abstract We investigate the nature and duration of incompatibility between certain combinations of Acromyrmex leaf‐cutting ants and symbiotic fungi, taken from sympatric colonies of the same or a related species. Ant‐fungus incompatibility appeared to be largely independent of the ant species involved, but could be explained partly by genetic differences among the fungus cultivars. Following current theoretical considerations, we develop a hypothesis, originally proposed by S. A. Frank, that… 
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