PARENTS BENEFIT FROM EATING OFFSPRING: DENSITY-DEPENDENT EGG SURVIVORSHIP COMPENSATES FOR FILIAL CANNIBALISM

@inproceedings{Klug2006PARENTSBF,
  title={PARENTS BENEFIT FROM EATING OFFSPRING: DENSITY-DEPENDENT EGG SURVIVORSHIP COMPENSATES FOR FILIAL CANNIBALISM},
  author={H. Klug and K. Lindstr{\"o}m and C. S. St Mary},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract Why should animals knowingly consume their own young? It is difficult to imagine many circumstances in which eating one's own young (i.e., filial cannibalism) actually increases an individual's fitness; however, filial cannibalism commonly co-occurs with parental care in fishes. The evolutionary significance of filial cannibalism remains unclear. The most commonly accepted explanation is that filial cannibalism is a mechanism by which caring males gain energy or nutrients that they… Expand
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