PAIR INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE: LIGHT CURVES, SPECTRA, AND SHOCK BREAKOUT

@article{Kasen2011PAIRIS,
  title={PAIR INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE: LIGHT CURVES, SPECTRA, AND SHOCK BREAKOUT},
  author={Daniel Kasen and S. E. Woosley and Alexander Heger},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={734}
}
For the initial mass range (140 M☉ < M < 260 M☉) stars die in a thermonuclear runaway triggered by the pair-production instability. The supernovae they make can be remarkably energetic (up to ∼1053 erg) and synthesize considerable amounts of radioactive isotopes. Here we model the evolution, explosion, and observational signatures of representative pair instability supernovae (PI SNe) spanning a range of initial masses and envelope structures. The predicted light curves last for hundreds of… 

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