PACE trial authors continue to ignore their own null effect

@article{Vink2017PACETA,
  title={PACE trial authors continue to ignore their own null effect},
  author={M. Vink},
  journal={Journal of Health Psychology},
  year={2017},
  volume={22},
  pages={1134 - 1140}
}
  • M. Vink
  • Published 2017
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Health Psychology
Protocols and outcomes for the PACE trial were changed after the start of the trial. These changes made substantial differences, leading to exaggerated claims for the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy and graded exercise therapy in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. The small, self-reported improvements in subjective measures cannot be used to say the interventions are effective, particularly in light of the absence of objective improvement. Geraghty’s criticism of the… Expand
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