Oxytocin Shapes the Neural Circuitry of Trust and Trust Adaptation in Humans

@article{Baumgartner2008OxytocinST,
  title={Oxytocin Shapes the Neural Circuitry of Trust and Trust Adaptation in Humans},
  author={Thomas Baumgartner and Markus Heinrichs and Aline Vonlanthen and Urs Fischbacher and Ernst Fehr},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={2008},
  volume={58},
  pages={639-650}
}
Trust and betrayal of trust are ubiquitous in human societies. Recent behavioral evidence shows that the neuropeptide oxytocin increases trust among humans, thus offering a unique chance of gaining a deeper understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying trust and the adaptation to breach of trust. We examined the neural circuitry of trusting behavior by combining the intranasal, double-blind, administration of oxytocin with fMRI. We find that subjects in the oxytocin group show no change in… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
The investigators will test whether intranasal oxytocin (24 IU vs placebo) will induce effects on attention bias and startle comparable to those the investigators have shown to be… Expand
ConditionsPosttraumatic Stress Disorder
InterventionDrug
Interventional Clinical Trial
Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that is well known for its role in social and affiliative behavior in humans. Oxytocin receptors are significantly lowered in autistic individuals and… Expand
ConditionsBrain Dynamics in Healthy Adults
InterventionDrug
Observational Patient Registry Clinical Trial
The aim of this study was to assess whether administration of oxytocin intrapartum (Oxt) has any effect on Neonatal Primitive Reflexes (RNP) and if dose dependent. The secondary… Expand
ConditionsBonding, Breastfeeding, Newborn, (+2 more)
InterventionDrug
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