Oxytocin Increases Generosity in Humans

@article{Zak2007OxytocinIG,
  title={Oxytocin Increases Generosity in Humans},
  author={Paul J. Zak and Angela A. Stanton and Sheila Ahmadi},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2007},
  volume={2}
}
Human beings routinely help strangers at costs to themselves. Sometimes the help offered is generous—offering more than the other expects. The proximate mechanisms supporting generosity are not well-understood, but several lines of research suggest a role for empathy. In this study, participants were infused with 40 IU oxytocin (OT) or placebo and engaged in a blinded, one-shot decision on how to split a sum of money with a stranger that could be rejected. Those on OT were 80% more generous… 
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