Oxytocin Increases Gaze to the Eye Region of Human Faces

@article{Guastella2008OxytocinIG,
  title={Oxytocin Increases Gaze to the Eye Region of Human Faces},
  author={Adam John Guastella and Philip B. Mitchell and Mark R. Dadds},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2008},
  volume={63},
  pages={3-5}
}
BACKGROUND In nonhuman mammals, oxytocin has a critical role in peer recognition and social approach behavior. In humans, oxytocin has been found to enhance trust and the ability to interpret the emotions of others. It has been suggested that oxytocin may enhance facial processing by increasing focus on the eye region of human faces. METHODS In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, between-subject design, we tracked the eye movements of 52 healthy male volunteers who were presented… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
The investigators will test whether intranasal oxytocin (24 IU vs placebo) will induce effects on attention bias and startle comparable to those the investigators have shown to be… Expand
ConditionsPosttraumatic Stress Disorder
InterventionDrug
Interventional Clinical Trial
The focus of the current project is to advance our understanding of the effects of oxytocin (OT) on components of social cognition in schizophrenia (SCZ). Despite the rapid increase in… Expand
ConditionsSchizophrenia
InterventionDrug, Other
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The findings suggest that nasal oxytocin administration selectively changes the allocation of attention and emotional arousal in domestic dogs, and provides further support for the role of the Oxytocinergic system in the social perception abilities of domestic dogs. Expand
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TLDR
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Does oxytocin influence the early detection of angry and happy faces?
TLDR
The results of this study suggest that oxytocin may not influence the detection of positive and threatening social stimuli at early perceptual levels of processing, and may have greater influence in altering the cognitive processing of social valence at more conceptual and elaborate levels ofprocessing. Expand
In the eye of the beholder? Oxytocin effects on eye movements in schizophrenia
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The Way Dogs (Canis familiaris) Look at Human Emotional Faces Is Modulated by Oxytocin. An Eye-Tracking Study
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It was found that dogs discriminated between human facial regions in their spontaneous viewing pattern and looked most to the eye region independently of facial expression, providing the first evidence that oxytocin is involved in the regulation of human face processing in dogs. Expand
Intranasal Oxytocin Increases Perceptual Salience of Faces in the Absence of Awareness
TLDR
New insights are provided into oxytocin’s modulatory role to social information processing, suggesting that Oxytocin might enhance attentional bias to social stimuli even after removal of awareness. Expand
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