Ovipositor length of threeApocrypta species: Effect on oviposition behavior and correlation with syconial thickness

@article{Zhen2009OvipositorLO,
  title={Ovipositor length of threeApocrypta species: Effect on oviposition behavior and correlation with syconial thickness},
  author={Wen-Quan Zhen and Da-Wei Huang and Jin-hua Xiao and Da-rong Yang and Chao-Dong Zhu and Hui Xiao},
  journal={Phytoparasitica},
  year={2009},
  volume={33},
  pages={113-120}
}
We investigated oviposition behavior in three non-pollinating fig wasps: the sympatric speciesApocrypta bakeri Joseph onFicus hispida L.,A. westwoodi Grandi onF. racemosa L., andApocrypta sp. onF. semicordata Buch.-Ham. The oviposition behavior differs significantly between one pair of species (A. bakeri andA. westwoodi) and the other species (Apocrypta sp. onF. semicordata).A. bakeri andA. westwoodi were similar in the following aspects: the posture of the abdomen and the action of the hind… Expand

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