Oviposition site selection in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera): constraints and compromises

@article{Robertson2004OvipositionSS,
  title={Oviposition site selection in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera): constraints and compromises},
  author={Hamish Gibson Robertson},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={73},
  pages={601-608}
}
  • H. Robertson
  • Published 1 October 1987
  • Environmental Science
  • Oecologia
SummaryOviposition by Cactoblastis cactorum on Opuntia ficus-indica and O. aurantiaca was assessed from the positioning of egg sticks on plants in the field. The number of egg sticks laid on O. ficus-indica plants was affected by: (1) plant size; (2) moth emergence near the plant; (3) cladode condition; and (4) plant conspicuousness. These factors contributed towards the clumping of egg sticks on plants. There was no apparent oviposition preference for one of the two host plant species despite… 
Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) use of Opuntia host species in Argentina
TLDR
Cactoblastis cactorum showed a geographical pattern of host use in its native range that was related to host availability, and could provide useful information for assessing the risk and future spread of this insect in North America.
Targets of an Invasive Species: Oviposition Preference and Larval Performance of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) on 14 North American Opuntioid Cacti
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Results from a field experiment showed that female moths preferred O. engelmannii Salm-Dyck ex Engelmann variety linguiformis (Griffiths) Parfitt and Pinkava and O. streptacantha Lemaire for oviposition, and in general, ovipposition preference was not correlated with larval performance.
Egg Parasitoids Attacking Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in North Florida
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The use of Trichogramma wasps as an inundative biological control agent, complementary to the Sterile Insect Technique application, is discussed.
Lack of Associational Effects between Two Hosts of an Invasive Herbivore: Opuntia Spp. and Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)
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The occurrence of associational susceptibility driven by a spillover mechanism may require a higher Herbivore density and a sparser distribution of the herbivore's preferred host than was present at the sites use here.
Larval morphology and host use confirms ecotypic variation in Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg)
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It is shown that groups defined by genetic structure in this species’ native range are concordant with distinct patterns of host association and larval morphology, and in Florida populations, morphological traits have diverged from those found in the native range, and patterns ofhost association suggest that strong biases in host preference also occur in invasive populations.
The Role of Host Identity in Determining the Distribution of the Invasive Moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Florida
TLDR
The results suggest that understanding patterns of C. cactorum infestation, both in Florida and as it spreads towards the western United States relies, at least in part, on determining the mechanism by which O. stricta influences the suitability of specific host communities.
DISTRIBUTION AND DISPERSAL OF CACTOBLASTIS CACTORUM (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE), AN EXOTIC OPUNTIA-FEEDING MOTH, IN FLORIDA
TLDR
The recent arrival of Cactoblastis cactorum Berg in Florida has raised concern for Florida's native Opuntia cacti, and over time there may expect to see a reduction in the number of plants as a result of an increase in the mortality rate of recruits.
The renowned cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): its natural history and threat to native Opuntia floras in Mexico and the United States of America.
TLDR
This paper identifies some of the attributes that have contributed to the success of C. cactorum as a weed biological control agent and predispose it as a major threat to the speciose, native Opuntia-floras of Central and North America.
Inherited sterility in Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)
TLDR
Newly emerged male and female adult cactus moths, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg), were treated with increasing doses of gamma radiation, and the moths were outcrossed to fertile counterparts, and a shift in the F1 sex ratio in favor of males was not observed.
Observations on Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) as a Pest of Cactus Pear (Opuntia ficus-indica) in Argentina with Suggestions On Possible Control Methods
TLDR
C. cactorum is native of South America and has been used in the biological control of several Opuntia spp.
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