Oviposition site selection by the diamondback moth,Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)

@article{Justus2005OvipositionSS,
  title={Oviposition site selection by the diamondback moth,Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)},
  author={Kristine A. Justus and B. K. Mitchell},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={9},
  pages={887-898}
}
AlthoughPlutella xylostella (L.) is a worldwide pest of cruciferous crops, relatively little is known about its oviposition behaviour. This study was undertaken to provide necessary information about mechanisms involved inP. xylostella host selection. Four oviposition behaviours were described. Moths were given artificial substrates treated with water, sinigrin, orBrassica napus (cv. Westar) squashes, combined withB. napus volatiles and/or grooves in the substrate. No eggs were deposited in the… 
Oviposition by Female Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Description and Time Budget Analysis of Behaviors in Laboratory Studies
The oviposition behavior of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a major insect pest of durable stored foods, was studied in small experimental arenas under
Relationship between adult oviposition preference and larval performance of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella
TLDR
Adult oviposition preference and larval performance of P. xylostella were positively related, so at least for undamaged (not induced) plants mother appears to know best.
Semiochemical-mediated oviposition behaviour by peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa (Lepidoptera:Sesiidae)
TLDR
The data suggests that gum-frass semiochemicals play a significant role in oviposition decisions by female S. exitiosa, and that larvae produce a pheromone of as yet unknown biological significance.
Seasonal phenology of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), (Lepidoptera : Plutellidae), and its parasitoids on canola, Brassica napus (L.), in Gauteng province, South Africa
TLDR
The composition, relative abundance and seasonal phenology of parasitoids attacking P. xylostella populations on canola were determined and a large number of larvae, especially first instars, were overlooked during visual plant scouting.
Dead-twig discrimination for oviposition in a cicada, Cryptotympana facialis (Hemiptera: Cicadidae)
TLDR
Examination of oviposition-related behaviors of a cicada, Cryptotympana facialis, found that egg laying into freshly cut live twigs is abandoned in two phases, i.e., before and after initiation of egg nest-creating behavior with the ovipositor.
Effects of Conspecific Herbivory and Mating Status on Host Searching and Oviposition Behavior of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) in Relation to Its Host, Brassica oleracea (Brassicales: Brassicaceae)
  • S. Wee
  • Biology
    Florida Entomologist
  • 2016
TLDR
The potential of developing a brassica host-derived kairomone attractant as a useful monitoring tool for female diamondback moths in area-wide integrated pest management programs that have a sterile insect technique (SIT) component is indicated.
Understanding the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) performance in plant alternative cropping systems
TLDR
The study shows the complexity of DBM’s interaction with its host plants and adds to the mounting amount of evidence towards the effectiveness of an intercropping system in controlling pest infestation.
Influence of plant sulphur nutrition on oviposition and larval performance of the diamondback moth
TLDR
Maintaining higher levels of sulphur in the plant nutrient solution benefits insect performance, both at the adult and larval stage, and it also plays an important role in acceptance by P. xylostella of the host plant.
Flight and Oviposition Behavior Toward Different Host Plant Species by the Cabbage Moth, Mamestra brassicae (L.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
The laboratory colony was started from wild adults collected from alight trap at Tackley, Oxfordshire, UK, during June 1995 and wild insectswereaddedto thecolonyeachsummer. Allinsectswerereared
Semiochemical‐mediated oviposition behavior by female peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa
TLDR
Gum frass semiochemicals signal a potential host tree, and induce oviposition by female S. exitiosa, an important pest of commercial cultivations of peach trees, and may lead to the development of a new earth‐friendly tactic within integrated programs for control of S.exitiosa.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES
ATTRACTION OF DIAMONDBACK MOTHS, PLUTELLA XYLOSTELLA (L.) (LEPIDOPTERA: PLUTELLIDAE), BY VOLATILE COMPOUNDS OF CANOLA, WHITE MUSTARD, AND FABA BEAN
TLDR
Electroantennogram (EAG) tests showed that both male and female moths perceived the plant extracts through antennal receptors, especially to white mustard and faba bean extracts.
FOOD PLANT RELATIONSHIPS OF THE DIAMOND‐BACK MOTH (PLUTELLA MACULIPENNIS (CURT.)) II. Sensory Regulation of Oviposition of the Adult Female
TLDR
Depletion of isothiocyanate content by sulfur‐deficient plant nutrition appears to reduce attractiveness of host plants as egg substrates, and eggs are laid preferentially in concavities of leaves or stems.
Sexual dimorphism of tarsal receptors and sensory equipment of the ovipositor in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis
TLDR
Sensilla on legs and ovipositor of the moth Ostrinia nubilalis were investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy and a sexual dimorphism was found in the number and density of these sensilla.
Approaches and Methods for Direct Behavioral Observation and Analysis of Plant-Insect Interactions
Perhaps the greatest contribution of Konrad Lorenz to the discipline of ethology was to advocate use of biological investigatory methods for behavioral studies of animals (Tinbergen, 1963).
Describing Sequences of Behavior
TLDR
It is suggested that first-order transition analysis and correlative techniques are the best current methods for examining sequences of behavior and the search for higher-order dependencies is useful only in stationary data, where grouping of acts due to changing causal factors can be assumed to be unimportant.
Identification of chemical imposition stimulants for the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, present in three species of Brassicaceae
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the moths do not discriminate between glucosinolates with different side‐chain structures, and in tests using allylglucosinolate the oviposition response was dose‐dependent, and one of the species tested, S. alba, contained a possible Oviposition deterrent.
...
...