Oviposition Site Selection by the Regal Fritillary, Speyeria idalia, as Affected by Proximity of Violet Host Plants

@article{Kopper2004OvipositionSS,
  title={Oviposition Site Selection by the Regal Fritillary, Speyeria idalia, as Affected by Proximity of Violet Host Plants},
  author={Brian J. Kopper and Ralph E. Charlton and David C. Margolies},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2004},
  volume={13},
  pages={651-665}
}
Selection of oviposition sites by female regal fritillary butterflies, Speyeria idalia (Drury), in relation to the location and abundance of their larval food plant, Viola pedatifida G. Don, was studied in Kansas tallgrass prairie. [...] Key Method To identify potential cues that females use to select oviposition microsites, we compared plots in which eggs were laid with paired control plots in terms of violet abundance, distance from plot center to the nearest violet plant, plant species composition and…Expand

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Behavioral Ecology of the Regal Fritillary, Speyeria idalia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), in Kansas Tallgrass Prairie: Reproductive Diapause, Factors Influencing
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