Overweight, obesity, and mortality in a large prospective cohort of persons 50 to 71 years old.

@article{Adams2006OverweightOA,
  title={Overweight, obesity, and mortality in a large prospective cohort of persons 50 to 71 years old.},
  author={Kenneth F. Adams and Arthur Schatzkin and Tamara B. Harris and Victor Kipnis and Traci Mouw and Rachel Ballard‐Barbash and Albert R. Hollenbeck and Michael F. Leitzmann},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={355 8},
  pages={
          763-78
        }
}
BACKGROUND Obesity, defined by a body-mass index (BMI) (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of 30.0 or more, is associated with an increased risk of death, but the relation between overweight (a BMI of 25.0 to 29.9) and the risk of death has been questioned. [...] Key MethodMETHODS We prospectively examined BMI in relation to the risk of death from any cause in 527,265 U.S. men and women in the National Institutes of Health-AARP cohort who were 50 to 71 years old at…Expand
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Body mass and weight change in adults in relation to mortality risk.
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