Overview of the cestode fauna of European shrews of the genus Sorex with comments on the fauna in Neomys and Crocidura and an exploration of historical processes in post-glacial Europe

@article{Binkien2011OverviewOT,
  title={Overview of the cestode fauna of European shrews of the genus Sorex with comments on the fauna in Neomys and Crocidura and an exploration of historical processes in post-glacial Europe},
  author={Rasa Binkienė and Vytautas L. Kontrimavichus and Eric P. Hoberg},
  journal={Helminthologia},
  year={2011},
  volume={48},
  pages={207-228}
}
SummaryThe cestode fauna in shrews of the genus Sorex from the European region consists of seventeen species. Twelve cestode species have broad Palearctic distributions, three belong to the Western-Asian-European faunistic complex, and only two are endemic to the European zone. Postglacial expansion into the European territory resulted in geographic colonization by sixteen species. The large number of cestode species with transpalearctic ranges, as well as paleontological data indicating a… 

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