Overshadowing the Reminiscence Bump: Memories of a Struggle for Independence

@article{Conway1999OvershadowingTR,
  title={Overshadowing the Reminiscence Bump: Memories of a Struggle for Independence},
  author={Martin A. Conway and Shamsul Haque},
  journal={Journal of Adult Development},
  year={1999},
  volume={6},
  pages={35-44}
}
We describe a study in which young and older groups of Bangladeshi participants recalled and dated autobiographical memories from across the lifespan. Memories were subsequently plotted in terms of the age of participants at time of encoding. As expected the reminiscence bump, preferential recall of memories from the period of 10 to 30 years of age, was observed. This was very marked in the younger group and but less so in the older group who also showed a second bump in the period 35 to 55… 
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