Overriding stimulus-driven attentional capture

@article{Bacon1994OverridingSA,
  title={Overriding stimulus-driven attentional capture},
  author={William F. Bacon and Howard E. Egeth},
  journal={Perception \& Psychophysics},
  year={1994},
  volume={55},
  pages={485-496}
}
  • W. Bacon, H. Egeth
  • Published 1 September 1994
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perception & Psychophysics
Theeuwes (1992) found a distracting effect of irrelevant-dimension singletons in a task involving search for a known target. He argued from this that selectivity is determined solely by stimulus salience; the parallel stage of visual processing cannot provide top-down guidance to the attentive stage sufficient to permit completely selective use of task-relevant information. We argue that in the task used by Theeuwes, subjects may have adopted the strategy of searching for an odd form even… 
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