Overdiagnosis: How Our Compulsion for Diagnosis May Be Harming Children

@article{Coon2014OverdiagnosisHO,
  title={Overdiagnosis: How Our Compulsion for Diagnosis May Be Harming Children},
  author={Eric R. Coon and Ricardo A. Quinonez and Virginia A. Moyer and Alan R. Schroeder},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2014},
  volume={134},
  pages={1013 - 1023}
}
Overdiagnosis occurs when a true abnormality is discovered, but detection of that abnormality does not benefit the patient. It should be distinguished from misdiagnosis, in which the diagnosis is inaccurate, and it is not synonymous with overtreatment or overuse, in which excess medication or procedures are provided to patients for both correct and incorrect diagnoses. Overdiagnosis for adult conditions has gained a great deal of recognition over the last few years, led by realizations that… Expand
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