Outdoor activity and myopia in Singapore teenage children

@article{Dirani2009OutdoorAA,
  title={Outdoor activity and myopia in Singapore teenage children},
  author={Mohamed Dirani and Louis Tong and Gus Gazzard and Xifang Zhang and Audrey Chia and Terri L. Young and Kathryn Ailsa Rose and Paul Mitchell and Seang-Mei Saw},
  journal={British Journal of Ophthalmology},
  year={2009},
  volume={93},
  pages={1000 - 997}
}
Aim: To investigate the relationship of outdoor activities and myopia in Singapore teenage children. Methods: Teenage children (1249 participants), examined in the Singapore Cohort study Of Risk factors for Myopia (SCORM), during 2006 were included in analyses. Participants completed questionnaires that quantified total outdoor activity, and underwent an eye examination. Results: The mean total time spent on outdoor activity was 3.24 h/day. The total outdoor activity (h/day) was significantly… 

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