Outcomes of care in birth centers: demonstration of a durable model.

@article{Stapleton2013OutcomesOC,
  title={Outcomes of care in birth centers: demonstration of a durable model.},
  author={Susan Stapleton and Cara Osborne and Jessica Illuzzi},
  journal={Journal of midwifery \& women's health},
  year={2013},
  volume={58 1},
  pages={
          3-14
        }
}
INTRODUCTION The safety and effectiveness of birth center care have been demonstrated in previous studies, including the National Birth Center Study and the San Diego Birth Center Study. This study examines outcomes of birth center care in the present maternity care environment. METHODS This was a prospective cohort study of women receiving care in 79 midwifery-led birth centers in 33 US states from 2007 to 2010. Data were entered into the American Association of Birth Centers Uniform Data… Expand
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