Outcomes of AA for special populations.

@article{Timko2008OutcomesOA,
  title={Outcomes of AA for special populations.},
  author={C. Timko},
  journal={Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism},
  year={2008},
  volume={18},
  pages={
          373-92
        }
}
  • C. Timko
  • Published 2008
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism
This chapter reviews research examining outcomes of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) for special populations. It begins by discussing what is meant by the term “special populations” and why the question of if and how AA is beneficial for special populations needs to be considered. The chapter then examines studies of outcomes of AA participation among women, adolescents, and the elderly, racial and ethnic minority groups, disabled individuals, and people with co-occurring substance abuse and mental… Expand

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