Outcome of hospital care of liver disease associated with hepatitis C in the United States

@article{Kim2001OutcomeOH,
  title={Outcome of hospital care of liver disease associated with hepatitis C in the United States},
  author={W. Ray Kim and John B. Gross and John J. Poterucha and Giles Richard Locke and E. Rolland Dickson},
  journal={Hepatology},
  year={2001},
  volume={33}
}
We describe mortality and resource utilization for inpatient care of hepatitis C (HCV) in comparison to alcohol‐induced liver disease (ALD) in the United States and identify factors that affect outcomes. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database, a national inpatient sample was used to identify hospitalization records with diagnoses related to liver disease from HCV and ALD. Outcome of hospitalizations was analyzed in terms of in‐hospital deaths and health care resource utilization… 
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