Out of one’s mind: A study of involuntary semantic memories

@article{Kvavilashvili2004OutOO,
  title={Out of one’s mind: A study of involuntary semantic memories},
  author={L. Kvavilashvili and G. Mandler},
  journal={Cognitive Psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={48},
  pages={47-94}
}
The study of memories that pop into one's mind without any conscious attempt to retrieve them began only recently. While there are some studies on involuntary autobiographical memories (e.g., ) research on involuntary semantic memories or mind-popping is virtually non-existent. The latter is defined as an involuntary conscious occurrence of brief items of one's network of semantic knowledge. The recall of these items (e.g., a word, a name, a tune) is not accompanied by additional contextual… Expand

Paper Mentions

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