Out of Africa: Fossils shed light on the origin of the hoatzin, an iconic Neotropic bird

@article{Mayr2011OutOA,
  title={Out of Africa: Fossils shed light on the origin of the hoatzin, an iconic Neotropic bird},
  author={Gerald Mayr and Herculano Marcos Ferraz Alvarenga and C{\'e}cile Mourer-Chauvir{\'e}},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2011},
  volume={98},
  pages={961-966}
}
We describe the earliest fossils of the enigmatic avian taxon Opisthocomiformes (hoatzins) from the Oligo-Miocene (22–24 mya) of Brazil. The bones, a humerus, scapula and coracoid, closely resemble those of the extant hoatzin, Opisthocomus hoazin. The very similar osteology of the pectoral girdle in the new Brazilian fossil compared to the extant O. hoazin, in which it reflects peculiar feeding adaptations, may indicate that hoatzins had already evolved their highly specialized feeding behavior… 
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