Out‐of‐Africa origin and dispersal‐mediated diversification of the butterfly genus Junonia (Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae)

@article{Kodandaramaiah2007OutofAfricaOA,
  title={Out‐of‐Africa origin and dispersal‐mediated diversification of the butterfly genus Junonia (Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae)},
  author={U. Kodandaramaiah and N. Wahlberg},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={20}
}
The relative importance of dispersal and vicariance in the diversification of taxa has been much debated. Within butterflies, a few studies published so far have demonstrated vicariant patterns at the global level. We studied the historical biogeography of the genus Junonia (Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae) at the intercontinental level based on a molecular phylogeny. The genus is distributed over all major biogeographical regions of the world except the Palaearctic. We found dispersal to be the… Expand
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