Osteological evidence for sister group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes)

@article{Bourdon2005OsteologicalEF,
  title={Osteological evidence for sister group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes)},
  author={Estelle Bourdon},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2005},
  volume={92},
  pages={586-591}
}
  • E. Bourdon
  • Published 21 October 2005
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Naturwissenschaften
The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two… 
Bony‐toothed birds (Aves: Pelagornithidae) from the Middle Eocene of Belgium
TLDR
The coracoid distinctly differs from that of extant ‘pelecaniform’ birds, and the plesiomorphic presence of a foramen nervi supracoracoidei as well as the absence of a well‐delimited articulation facet for the furcula supports a position outside the Suloidea, the clade to which the Sulidae belong.
Phylogenetic Analysis of Pelecaniformes (Aves) Based on Osteological Data: Implications for Waterbird Phylogeny and Fossil Calibration Studies
TLDR
Relationships of extant pelecaniforms inferred from morphology are more congruent with molecular phylogenies than previously assumed, though notable conflicts remain.
A SKULL OF THE GIANT BONY‐TOOTHED BIRD DASORNIS (AVES: PELAGORNITHIDAE) FROM THE LOWER EOCENE OF THE ISLE OF SHEPPEY
TLDR
It is hypothesized that giant size evolved only once within Pelagornithidae and that Dasornis emuinus is the sister taxon of the giant Neogene bony‐toothed birds, which share a derived wing morphology.
Osteology of a New Giant Bony-Toothed Bird from the Miocene of Chile, with a Revision of the Taxonomy of Neogene Pelagornithidae
TLDR
An exceptionally well-preserved giant species from the late Miocene of the Bahía Inglesa Formation in northern Chile, in which most major limb bones are complete and uncrushed, that is one of the largest known pelagornithids and the three-dimensionally preserved bones allow recognition of many previously unknown osteological features.
Diversity of pseudo-toothed birds (Pelagornithidae) from the Eocene of Antarctica
TLDR
The oldest Antarctic pseudo-toothed bird is reported, represented by an incomplete humerus lacking its proximal end, which comes from the lower Eocene levels of the La Meseta Formation (Seymour Island) and facilitates a review of all known pelagornithids from this continent.
Pseudotoothed Birds (Aves, Odontopterygiformes) from the Early Tertiary of Morocco
TLDR
This work provides evidence that Dasornis was widespread in the early Tertiary, as it is currently known from the Lower Paleogene deposits of Morocco, England, and Kazakhstan, and Paleoenvironmental studies show that these marine deposits formed in a tropical climate.
Bony pseudoteeth of extinct pelagic birds (Aves, Odontopterygiformes) formed through a response of bone cells to tooth-specific epithelial signals under unique conditions
TLDR
Dynamic morphogenetic fields can explain the particular, sequential size distribution of pseudoteeth along the jaws of these birds, and appear as a new kind of deep homology, by which ancient odontogenetic developmental processes would have controlled the evolution of pseudodentition.
The Earliest Record (Early Miocene) of a Bony-Toothed Bird from South America and a Reexamination of Venezuelan Pelagornithids
ABSTRACT Pelagornithids or bony-toothed birds were an enigmatic group of very large marine birds that existed throughout most of the Tertiary, with remains recovered in all continents. The
Higher-order phylogeny of modern birds (Theropoda, Aves: Neornithes) based on comparative anatomy. II. Analysis and discussion
TLDR
A phylogenetic (cladistic) analysis of 150 taxa of Neornithes, including exemplars from all non-passeriform families, and subordinal representatives of Passeriformes, confirmed the topology among outgroup Theropoda and achieved robust resolution at virtually all levels of the NeornIthes.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 79 REFERENCES
Systematic relationships of the palaeogene family Presbyornithidae (Aves: Anseriformes)
TLDR
The often suggested close relationship of anseriform and galliform birds is not confirmed by osteology, and the Anseriformes and the Phoenicopteridae form a monophyletic clade that is the sister to the remaining ciconiiform birds.
A phylogenetic analysis of basal Anseriformes, the fossil Presbyornis, and the interordinal relationships of waterfowl
TLDR
The phylogenetic hypothesis is used to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario for selected ecomorphological characters in the galliform-anseriform transition, to predict the most parsimonious states of these characters for Presbyornis, and to propose a phylogenetic classification of the higher-order taxa of waterfowl.
EARLIEST AFRICAN NEORNITHINE BIRD: A NEW SPECIES OF PROPHAETHONTIDAE (AVES) FROM THE PALEOCENE OF MOROCCO
TLDR
A cladistic analysis of 47 osteological characters supports the monophyly of the Prophaethontidae and a sister-group relationship between the Prophyletic Pelecaniformes and Phaethont family, and justifies its assignment to a new genus and species.
A phylogenetic analysis of recent anseriform genera using morphological characters
--A phylogenetic analysis of all Recent genera of the Anseriformes using 120 morphological characters supports much of the current consensus regarding intraordinal relationships. I found that (1)
Monophyly and Phylogenetic Relationships of the Pelecaniformes: A Numerical Cladistic Analysis
TLDR
Evidence supporting a relationship between pelecaniforms and ciconiiforms is evaluated and considered insuffi- cient to warrant acceptance of that hypothesis at this time, while the hypothesis that the Whale-headed Stork (Balaeniceps rex) has a relationship to one or more pele caniform taxa was investigated and rejected.
The deep divergences of neornithine birds: a phylogenetic analysis of morphological characters
TLDR
A broad array of morphological characters (including both cranial and postcranial characters) are analyzed for an ingroup densely sampling Neornithes, with crown clade outgroups used to polarize these characters.
The phylogenetic affinities of the Shoebill (Balaeniceps rex)
  • G. Mayr
  • Biology
    Journal für Ornithologie
  • 2006
TLDR
A cladistic analysis of 54 anatomical characters resulted in monophyly of the shoebill and showed both Ciconiiformes and Pelecaniformes to be polyphyletic and the Phaethontidae share derived characters with the Procellariiformes, which might support a sister group relationship between the two taxa.
PSEUDODONTORNIS AND OTHER LARGE MARINE BIRDS FROM THE MIOCENE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
  • J. Hopson
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 1964
While engaged in the reorganization of the vertebrate fossil collections at the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, the writer discovered the incomplete lower jaw of a large bird from
Morphological and molecular support for nonmonophyly of the Galloanserae
This paper discusses morphological and molecular data bearing on the earliest evolution of the Neornithes. Phylogenetic analyses of basal neornithine groups frequently result in poorly resolved
The systematic position of the Miocene anatid Anas[?] blanchardi Milne-Edwards
TLDR
This reappraisal showed that blanchardi diverged from the rest of the Anatidae after Dendrocygna but before Stictonetta, and several possibly convergent characters indicate that Blanchardi was moderately specialized for diving.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...