Osteoderm morphology and development in the nine‐banded armadillo, Dasypus novemcinctus (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Cingulata)

@article{Vickaryous2006OsteodermMA,
  title={Osteoderm morphology and development in the nine‐banded armadillo, Dasypus novemcinctus (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Cingulata)},
  author={M. Vickaryous and B. Hall},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2006},
  volume={267}
}
Among modern mammals, armadillos (Xenarthra, Cingulata) are the only group that possesses osteoderms, bony inclusions within the integument. Along the body, osteoderms are organized into five discrete assemblages: the head, pectoral, banded, pelvic, and tail shields. The pectoral, banded, and pelvic shields articulate to form the carapace. We examined osteoderm skeletogenesis in the armadillo Dasypus novemcinctus using serial and whole‐mount histochemistry. Compared with the rest of the… Expand
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