Osteoarchaeological evidence for leprosy from western Central Asia.

@article{Blau2005OsteoarchaeologicalEF,
  title={Osteoarchaeological evidence for leprosy from western Central Asia.},
  author={Soren Blau and Vadim N. Yagodin},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2005},
  volume={126 2},
  pages={
          150-8
        }
}
  • S. Blau, V. Yagodin
  • Published 1 February 2005
  • Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
Published reports of palaeopathological analyses of skeletal collections from Central Asia are, to date, scarce. During the macroscopic examination of skeletal remains dating to the early first millennium AD from the Ustyurt Plateau, Uzbekistan, diagnostic features suggestive of leprosy were found on one individual from Devkesken 6. This adult female exhibited rhinomaxillary changes indicative of leprosy: resorption of the anterior nasal spine, rounding and widening of the nasal aperture… 
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