Oscillatory motion of a droplet in an active poroelastic two-phase model

@article{Kulawiak2018OscillatoryMO,
  title={Oscillatory motion of a droplet in an active poroelastic two-phase model},
  author={Dirk Alexander Kulawiak and Jakob L{\"o}ber and Markus B{\"a}r and Harald Engel},
  journal={Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics},
  year={2018}
}
We investigate flow-driven amoeboid motility as exhibited by microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. A poroelastic two-phase model with rigid boundaries is extended to the case of free boundaries and substrate friction. The cytoskeleton is modeled as an active viscoelastic solid permeated by a fluid phase describing the cytosol. A feedback loop between a chemical regulator, active mechanical deformations, and induced flows gives rise to oscillatory and irregular motion accompanied by spatio… 

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