Os Acromiale: Frequency, Anatomy, and Clinical Implications*

@article{Sammarco2000OsAF,
  title={Os Acromiale: Frequency, Anatomy, and Clinical Implications*},
  author={Vincent James Sammarco},
  journal={The Journal of Bone \& Joint Surgery},
  year={2000},
  volume={82},
  pages={394–400}
}
  • V. J. Sammarco
  • Published 1 March 2000
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
Background: Os acromiale is present when the anterior portion of the acromion has one or more separate ossicles. Its frequency has been documented, in radiographic and anatomical studies, to be between 1 and 15 percent. Reports of os acromiale associated with subacromial pathology have been cited to imply that this entity is a cause of subacromial impingement; however, no study has demonstrated an increased frequency of os acromiale in patients with shoulder pain compared with the frequency in… 

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