Orthographic Processing in Baboons (Papio papio)

@article{Grainger2012OrthographicPI,
  title={Orthographic Processing in Baboons (Papio papio)},
  author={Jonathan Grainger and St{\'e}phane Dufau and Marie Montant and Johannes C. Ziegler and Jo{\"e}l Fagot},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={336},
  pages={245 - 248}
}
Monkey See, Monkey Read An orthographic object such as a set of letters, and the ability to recognize such sets as words, is a key component of reading. The ability to develop these skills has often been attributed to the prior acquisition of a complex language. For example, we learn how letters sound and thus recognize when a particular letter makes up part of a word. However, orthographic processing is also a visual process, because we learn to recognize words as discrete objects, and the… Expand
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TLDR
The nature of the information used by baboons to discriminate words from nonwords is investigated and a possible visual account of word/nonword discrimination performance in monkeys is contrasted with effects of visual similarity. Expand
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Grainger, Dufau, Montant, Ziegler, and Fagot (2012a) taught six baboons to discriminate words from nonwords in an analogue of the lexical decision task. The baboons endorsed novel words more readilyExpand
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TLDR
Simulation of the unique learning trajectory of each baboon shows that the results can be interpreted equally well as an example of simple, familiarity-based discrimination of pixel maps without orthographic processing. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Results show that the IT cortex of untrained monkeys contains a reservoir of precursor features from which downstream brain regions could, with some supervised instruction, learn to support the visual recognition of written words. Expand
The inferior temporal cortex is a potential cortical precursor of orthographic processing in untrained monkeys
TLDR
The authors show that populations of neurons in the ventral visual pathway of macaque monkeys encode orthographic stimuli, indicating that this pathway might be a precursor of orthographic processing abilities. Expand
What Can We Learn From Monkeys About Orthographic Processing in Humans? A Reply to Ziegler et al.
TLDR
The authors argue that because baboons do not have a linguistic system but nevertheless perform like humans do, the neural mechanisms underlying orthographic processing in the two species must be similar and therefore nonlinguistic, and argue that these conclusions are logically fallacious and do not withstand empirical scrutiny. Expand
Do ‘literate’ pigeons (Columba livia) show mirror-word generalization?
Many children pass through a mirror stage in reading, where they write individual letters or digits in mirror and find it difficult to correctly utilize letters that are mirror images of one anotherExpand
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