Orthodontic anomalies and malocclusions in Late Antique and Early Mediaeval period in Croatia.

@article{Vodanovi2012OrthodonticAA,
  title={Orthodontic anomalies and malocclusions in Late Antique and Early Mediaeval period in Croatia.},
  author={Marin Vodanovi{\'c} and Ivan Gali{\'c} and Mihovil Struji{\'c} and Kristina Pero{\vs} and Mario {\vS}laus and Hrvoje Brki{\'c}},
  journal={Archives of oral biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={57 4},
  pages={
          401-12
        }
}
OBJECTIVE Malocclusions are relative infrequently analysed in bioarchaeological investigations and if investigated the samples are very small. This research provides analysis of orthodontic anomalies of even 1118 individuals from the Late Antique (LA) and Early Mediaeval (EM) period. Aims were to describe the prevalence of orthodontic anomalies in this historical period and to analyse which orthodontic anomalies are best suitable for bioarchaeological investigations. METHODS 1118 skulls were… Expand
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