Orrorin tugenensis Femoral Morphology and the Evolution of Hominin Bipedalism

@article{Richmond2008OrrorinTF,
  title={Orrorin tugenensis Femoral Morphology and the Evolution of Hominin Bipedalism},
  author={Brian G. Richmond and William L. Jungers},
  journal={Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={319},
  pages={1662 - 1665}
}
Bipedalism is a key human adaptation and a defining feature of the hominin clade. Fossil femora discovered in Kenya and attributed to Orrorin tugenensis, at 6 million years ago, purportedly provide the earliest postcranial evidence of hominin bipedalism, but their functional and phylogenetic affinities are controversial. We show that the O. tugenensis femur differs from those of apes and Homo and most strongly resembles those of Australopithecus and Paranthropus, indicating that O. tugenensis… Expand
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