Oro-facial manifestations in patients with eating disorders

@article{Romanos2012OrofacialMI,
  title={Oro-facial manifestations in patients with eating disorders},
  author={Georgios E. Romanos and F. Javed and Enisa B. Romanos and Ray Williams},
  journal={Appetite},
  year={2012},
  volume={59},
  pages={499-504}
}
Studies have reported that the oral health status is jeopardized in patients with eating disorders. The aim was to review the oro-facial manifestations in patients with eating disorders. The address the focused question was "What is the oro-dental health status in patients with eating disorders?" MEDLINE/PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched from 1948 to March 2012 using the following terms in various combinations: "Anorexia nervosa", "bulimia nervosa", "eating disorders", "dental… 
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There is a need for dentists with specialized knowledge about EDs and communication skills that emphasize an open, empathic, recognition approach from the dentist toward patients with EDs.
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TLDR
Oral healthcare professionals may be among the first to suspect that a patient has an eating disorder: they can play a role in diagnosis and appropriate referral, as well as providing appropriate oral healthcare advice.
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The impact of bulimia nervosa on oral health: A review of the literature
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Research is required given the limitations of current studies, especially gender imbalances among the populations studied and a lack of clear focus on bulimia nervosa, which has a lifetime prevalence of 1%.
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