Origins of Hot Jupiters

@article{Dawson2018OriginsOH,
  title={Origins of Hot Jupiters},
  author={R. Dawson and J. Johnson},
  journal={arXiv: Earth and Planetary Astrophysics},
  year={2018}
}
Hot Jupiters were the first exoplanets to be discovered around main sequence stars and astonished us with their close-in orbits. They are a prime example of how exoplanets have challenged our textbook, solar-system inspired story of how planetary systems form and evolve. More than twenty years after the discovery of the first hot Jupiter, there is no consensus on their predominant origin channel. Three classes of hot Jupiter creation hypotheses have been proposed: in situ formation, disk… Expand

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