Origins and genetic legacy of prehistoric dogs

@article{Bergstrm2020OriginsAG,
  title={Origins and genetic legacy of prehistoric dogs},
  author={Anders Bergstr{\"o}m and Laurent Alain François Frantz and Ryan W. Schmidt and Erik Ersmark and Oph{\'e}lie Lebrasseur and Linus Girdland-Flink and Audrey T. Lin and Jan Stor{\aa} and Karl-G{\"o}ran Sj{\"o}gren and David Anthony and Ekaterina E. Antipina and Sarieh Amiri and Guy Bar-Oz and Vladimir I. Bazaliiskii and Jelena Bulatovi{\'c} and Dorcas Brown and Alberto Carmagnini and Tom Davy and Sergey Fedorov and Ivana Fiore and Deirdre Fulton and Mietje Germonpr{\'e} and James Haile and Evan K. Irving-Pease and Alexandra Jamieson and Luc A. A. Janssens and Irina V. Kirillova and Liora Kolska Horwitz and Julka Kuzmanovi{\'c}-Cvetkovi{\'c} and Yaroslav Kuzmin and Robert J. Losey and Daria Lo{\vz}njak Dizdar and Marjan Mashkour and Mario Novak and Vedat Onar and David C. Orton and Maja Pasari{\'c} and Miljana Radivojevi{\'c} and Dragana Rajkovi{\'c} and Benjamin Roberts and Hannah Ryan and Mikhail V. Sablin and Fedor K. Shidlovskiy and Iva Rai{\vc} Stojanovi{\'c} and Antonio Tagliacozzo and Katerina Trantalidou and Inga Ull{\'e}n and Aritza Villaluenga and Paula Wapnish and Keith M. Dobney and Anders G{\"o}therstr{\"o}m and Anna Linderholm and Love Dal{\'e}n and Ron Pinhasi and Greger Larson and Pontus Skoglund},
  journal={Science},
  year={2020},
  volume={370},
  pages={557 - 564}
}
Dog domestication was multifaceted Dogs were the first domesticated animal, likely originating from human-associated wolves, but their origin remains unclear. Bergstrom et al. sequenced 27 ancient dog genomes from multiple locations near to and corresponding in time to comparable human ancient DNA sites (see the Perspective by Pavlidis and Somel). By analyzing these genomes, along with other ancient and modern dog genomes, the authors found that dogs likely arose once from a now-extinct wolf… 
Dog domestication and the dual dispersal of people and dogs into the Americas
TLDR
Comparing population genetic results of humans and dogs from Siberia, Beringia, and North America shows that there is a close correlation in the movement and divergences of their respective lineages, and suggests that dogs were domesticated in Siberia by ∼23,000 y ago, possibly while both people and wolves were isolated during the harsh climate of the Last Glacial Maximum.
Of dogs and men
TLDR
Whether dog domestication happened once or multiple times, whether dog dispersals and adaptations were coupled to those of humans, and how dogs interacted with their wild sisters, the wolves is resolved.
Modern Siberian dog ancestry was shaped by several thousand years of Eurasian-wide trade and human dispersal
TLDR
The analysis of 49 ancient dog genomes reveals that the ancestry of Arctic Siberia dogs shifted over the last 2,000 years due to an influx of dogs from the Eurasian Steppe and Europe, which resulted in substantial admixture in the Iamal-Nenets region.
The Fox Domestication Experiment and Dog Evolution: A View Based on Modern Molecular, Genetic, and Archaeological Data
TLDR
There are parallels in behavior change and its molecular genetic basis between domesticated foxes and dogs, with a special focus on the so-called “ancient” breeds.
Biological and cultural history of domesticated dogs in the Americas
TLDR
The history of domestication in the Americas is far from simple and integrative studies are needed, and the main gap in knowledge points to the relationships between American breeds, local hybridizations, migratory routes of dogs following Indigenous peoples' social networks, historical-cultural contexts, and quantification of morphological diversity.
A refined proposal for the origin of dogs: the case study of Gnirshöhle, a Magdalenian cave site
TLDR
It is proposed that both domestication and the existence of a specialized wolf ecomorph are highly probable, due to their proximity to humans and a restricted diet, and domestication as the most likely scenario explaining the patterns observed herein.
Commensalism or Cross-Species Adoption? A Critical Review of Theories of Wolf Domestication
  • J. Serpell
  • Biology
    Frontiers in Veterinary Science
  • 2021
TLDR
It is concluded that the commensal scavenger hypothesis is untenable based on what is known about recent and ancient hunter-gatherer societies, and that wolf domestication was predicated on the establishment of cooperative social relations between humans and wolves based on the early socialization of wolf pups.
The Japanese wolf is most closely related to modern dogs and its ancestral genome has been widely inherited by dogs throughout East Eurasia
TLDR
Genomic analyses indicate that the Japanese wolf was a unique subspecies of the gray wolf that was genetically distinct from both modern and ancientgray wolves, lacking gene flow with other gray wolves, and shows significant genetic affinities with East Eurasian dogs.
Patagonian sheepdog: Genomic analyses trace the footprints of extinct UK herding dogs to South America
TLDR
It is proposed that the Patagonian sheepdog (PGOD) originated from the foundational herding dogs of the UK, prior to the Victorian explosion of breeds, and that they are the closest link to a now-extinct population of herding Dogs from which modern herding breeds descended.
Population Dynamics in Italian Canids between the Late Pleistocene and Bronze Age
TLDR
There is high genetic variability within ancient Italian canids, where close relationships were evident between both a ~24,700 years old Italian canid, and Iberian and Bulgarian ancient dogs, and the findings emphasize that disentangling dog domestication dynamics benefits from the analysis of specimens from Southern European regions.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 143 REFERENCES
Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs
TLDR
Results suggest that dogs may have been domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia from distinct wolf populations, and East Eurasian dogs were then possibly transported to Europe with people, where they partially replaced European Paleolithic dogs.
Complete Mitochondrial Genomes of Ancient Canids Suggest a European Origin of Domestic Dogs
TLDR
The findings imply that domestic dogs are the culmination of a process that initiated with European hunter-gatherers and the canids with whom they interacted, and molecular dating suggests an onset of domestication there 18,800 to 32,100 years ago.
The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas
TLDR
The analysis indicates that American dogs were not derived from North American wolves but likely originated from a Siberian ancestor, and form a monophyletic lineage that likely originated in Siberia and dispersed into the Americas alongside people.
Genome Sequencing Highlights the Dynamic Early History of Dogs
TLDR
It is found that none of the extant wolf lineages from putative domestication centers is more closely related to dogs, and, instead, the sampled wolves form a sister monophyletic clade, suggesting that a re-evaluation of past hypotheses regarding dog origins is necessary.
Ancient European dog genomes reveal continuity since the Early Neolithic
TLDR
The genomes of an Early and End Neolithic dog from Germany demonstrate continuity with each other and predominantly share ancestry with modern European dogs, contradicting a previously suggested Late Neolithic population replacement.
Ancient goat genomes reveal mosaic domestication in the Fertile Crescent
TLDR
It is demonstrated that multiple divergent ancient wild goat sources were domesticated in a dispersed process that resulted in genetically and geographically distinct Neolithic goat populations, echoing contemporaneous human divergence across the region.
Ancient DNA evidence from China reveals the expansion of Pacific dogs.
TLDR
It is proposed that A1b lineage dogs were once widely distributed in the YYRB area, and were largely replaced by dogs belonging to other lineages in the last 2,000 years in present-day China, especially North China.
Genetic structure in village dogs reveals a Central Asian domestication origin
TLDR
Strong evidence is found that dogs were domesticated in Central Asia, perhaps near present-day Nepal and Mongolia, and populations exhibit a clear gradient of short-range linkage disequilibrium consistent with a Central Asian domestication origin.
Specialized sledge dogs accompanied Inuit dispersal across the North American Arctic
TLDR
It is revealed that Inuit dogs derive from a secondary pre-contact migration of dogs distinct from Palaeo-Inuit dogs, and probably aided the Inuit expansion across the North American Arctic beginning around 1000 BP.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...