Origin of avian genome size and structure in non-avian dinosaurs

@article{Organ2007OriginOA,
  title={Origin of avian genome size and structure in non-avian dinosaurs},
  author={C. Organ and A. Shedlock and A. Meade and M. Pagel and S. Edwards},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={446},
  pages={180-184}
}
Avian genomes are small and streamlined compared with those of other amniotes by virtue of having fewer repetitive elements and less non-coding DNA. This condition has been suggested to represent a key adaptation for flight in birds, by reducing the metabolic costs associated with having large genome and cell sizes. However, the evolution of genome architecture in birds, or any other lineage, is difficult to study because genomic information is often absent for long-extinct relatives. Here we… Expand
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