Origin and status of the Great Lakes wolf

@article{Koblmller2009OriginAS,
  title={Origin and status of the Great Lakes wolf},
  author={Stephan Koblm{\"u}ller and Maria Nord and Robert K. Wayne and Jennifer A. Leonard},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2009},
  volume={18}
}
An extensive debate concerning the origin and taxonomic status of wolf‐like canids in the North American Great Lakes region and the consequences for conservation politics regarding these enigmatic predators is ongoing. Using maternally, paternally and biparentally inherited molecular markers, we demonstrate that the Great Lakes wolves are a unique population or ecotype of gray wolves. Furthermore, we show that the Great Lakes wolves experienced high degrees of ancient and recent introgression… Expand
Genetic outcomes of wolf recovery in the western Great Lakes states
TLDR
P phylogenetic and admixture analysis of DNA profiles of western wolves, WGL states wolves and Wisconsin coyotes developed from autosome and Y-chromosome microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA control region sequence support the recognition of Canis lycaon as a unique species of North American wolf present in the W GL states and find evidence of hybridization between C. lupus and C. Lycaon but no evidence of recent hybridization with sympatric coyotes. Expand
Sympatric wolf and coyote populations of the western Great Lakes region are reproductively isolated
TLDR
A genetic analysis of sympatric wolves and coyotes from the western Great Lakes region concludes that they are reproductively isolated and that wolf–coyote hybridization in the WGLR is uncommon, and concludes that the extant W GLR wolf population is derived from hybridization between grey wolves and eastern wolves. Expand
Wolves in the Great Lakes region: a phylogeographic puzzle
  • E. Randi
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Molecular ecology
  • 2010
TLDR
The study by Wheeldon et al. (2010) shows that sympatric wolves and coyotes are not (extensively) hybridizing in the western North American Great Lakes region (GLR). Expand
Molecules and beyond: assessing the distinctness of the Great Lakes wolf
TLDR
Tackling the difficult topic of Great Lakes wolf taxonomy is tackled and data are presented that suggest this taxon is currently genetically distinct despite a long history of human persecution and hybridization with related taxa. Expand
Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.
The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNAExpand
Population Genomic Analysis of North American Eastern Wolves (Canis lycaon) Supports Their Conservation Priority Status
TLDR
A population genomics approach is used to uncover spatial patterns of variation in 281 canids in central Ontario and the Great Lakes region, which represents the first genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dataset with substantial sample sizes of representative populations. Expand
Extinct Beringian wolf morphotype found in the continental U.S. has implications for wolf migration and evolution
TLDR
The presence of mid‐continental Beringian morphotypes adds important data for untangling the history of immigration and evolution of Canis in North America. Expand
Population genomics of grey wolves and wolf-like canids in North America
TLDR
The discriminatory power offered by the dataset suggests all North American grey wolves, including the Mexican form, are monophyletic, and thus share a common ancestor to the exclusion of all other wolves. Expand
Coyote colonization of northern Virginia and admixture with Great Lakes wolves
TLDR
Noninvasive molecular techniques are used to detect the geographic origins of the recent coyote colonization of northern Virginia as a representative of the mid-Atlantic region and to detect signatures of admixture with GLWs. Expand
Genetics and conservation of wolves Canis lupus in Europe
TLDR
The wolf Canis lupus, the most widespread of the four species of large carnivores in Europe, after centuries of population decline and eradication, is now recovering in many countries, and population structure and dynamics are efficiently monitored by non-invasive genetic methods. Expand
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