Origin and evolution of the integumentary skeleton in non‐tetrapod vertebrates

@article{Sire2009OriginAE,
  title={Origin and evolution of the integumentary skeleton in non‐tetrapod vertebrates},
  author={Jean-Yves Sire and Philip C. J. Donoghue and Matthew K. Vickaryous},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2009},
  volume={214}
}
Most non‐tetrapod vertebrates develop mineralized extra‐oral elements within the integument. Known collectively as the integumentary skeleton, these elements represent the structurally diverse skin‐bound contribution to the dermal skeleton. In this review we begin by summarizing what is known about the histological diversity of the four main groups of integumentary skeletal tissues: hypermineralized (capping) tissues; dentine; plywood‐like tissues; and bone. For most modern taxa, the… Expand
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