Origin and evolution of the 1918 "Spanish" influenza virus hemagglutinin gene.

@article{Reid1999OriginAE,
  title={Origin and evolution of the 1918 "Spanish" influenza virus hemagglutinin gene.},
  author={Ann H. Reid and Thomas G. Fanning and Johan Hultin and Jeffery K. Taubenberger},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1999},
  volume={96 4},
  pages={
          1651-6
        }
}
The "Spanish" influenza pandemic killed over 20 million people in 1918 and 1919, making it the worst infectious pandemic in history. Here, we report the complete sequence of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the 1918 virus. Influenza RNA for the analysis was isolated from a formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tissue sample prepared during the autopsy of a victim of the influenza pandemic in 1918. Influenza RNA was also isolated from lung tissue samples from two additional victims of the lethal… Expand
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