Origin and early evolution of vertebrate skeletonization

@article{Donoghue2002OriginAE,
  title={Origin and early evolution of vertebrate skeletonization},
  author={Philip C. J. Donoghue and Ivan J. Sansom},
  journal={Microscopy Research and Technique},
  year={2002},
  volume={59}
}
Data from living and extinct faunas of primitive vertebrates imply very different scenarios for the origin and evolution of the dermal and oral skeletal developmental system. A direct reading of the evolutionary relationships of living primitive vertebrates implies that the dermal scales, teeth, and jaws arose synchronously with a cohort of other characters that could be considered unique to jawed vertebrates: the dermoskeleton is primitively composed of numerous scales, each derived from an… 
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