Origin and diversification of the Greater Cape flora: ancient species repository, hot-bed of recent radiation, or both?

@article{Verboom2009OriginAD,
  title={Origin and diversification of the Greater Cape flora: ancient species repository, hot-bed of recent radiation, or both?},
  author={George Anthony Verboom and Jenny K. Archibald and Freek T. Bakker and Dirk U. Bellstedt and Ferozah Conrad and L{\'e}anne L. Dreyer and F{\'e}lix Forest and Chlo{\'e} Galley and Peter Goldblatt and Jack Henning and Klaus Mummenhoff and Hans Peter Linder and A. Muthama Muasya and Kenneth C. Oberlander and Vincent Savolainen and Deidre A Snijman and Timothe{\"u}s van der Niet and Tracey L. Nowell},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2009},
  volume={51 1},
  pages={
          44-53
        }
}
Time of diversification in the Cape fauna endemisms, inferred by phylogenetic studies of the genus Iselma (Coleoptera: Meloidae: Eleticinae)
TLDR
The endemic diversification of the Cape zone fauna and the phylogenetic relationships among the 30 species of the blister beetle genus Iselma are investigated and hypotheses of diversification times among taxa from molecular clock analyses are proposed.
Time of diversification in the Cape fauna endemisms, inferred by phylogenetic studies of the genus Iselma (Coleoptera: Meloidae: Eleticinae)
TLDR
The endemic diversification of the Cape zone fauna and the phylogenetic relationships among the 30 species of the blister beetle genus Iselma are investigated and hypotheses of diversification times among taxa from molecular clock analyses are proposed.
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Recent origin of Neotropical orchids in the world’s richest plant biodiversity hotspot
TLDR
The majority of Andean orchid lineages only originated in the last 15 million years, and it is suggested that mountain uplift promotes species diversification across all elevational zones.
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