Origin, diffusion, and differentiation of Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J: inferences on the neolithization of Europe and later migratory events in the Mediterranean area.

@article{Semino2004OriginDA,
  title={Origin, diffusion, and differentiation of Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J: inferences on the neolithization of Europe and later migratory events in the Mediterranean area.},
  author={Ornella Semino and Chiara Magri and Giorgia Benuzzi and Alice A. Lin and Nadia Al-Zahery and Vincenza Battaglia and Liliana Maccioni and Costas D. Triantaphyllidis and Peidong Shen and Peter J. Oefner and Lev A. Zhivotovsky and Roy J. King and Antonio Torroni and Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza and Peter A. Underhill and A. Silvana Santachiara‐Benerecetti},
  journal={American journal of human genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={74 5},
  pages={
          1023-34
        }
}
The phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroups E (Hg E) and J (Hg J) was investigated in >2400 subjects from 29 populations, mainly from Europe and the Mediterranean area but also from Africa and Asia. The observed 501 Hg E and 445 Hg J samples were subtyped using 36 binary markers and eight microsatellite loci. Spatial patterns reveal that (1). the two sister clades, J-M267 and J-M172, are distributed differentially within the Near East, North Africa, and Europe; (2). J-M267 was spread by two… 

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