Organic Food: Buying More Safety or Just Peace of Mind? A Critical Review of the Literature

@article{Magkos2006OrganicFB,
  title={Organic Food: Buying More Safety or Just Peace of Mind? A Critical Review of the Literature},
  author={Faidon Magkos and Fotini Arvaniti and Antonis Zampelas},
  journal={Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition},
  year={2006},
  volume={46},
  pages={23 - 56}
}
Consumer concern over the quality and safety of conventional food has intensified in recent years, and primarily drives the increasing demand for organically grown food, which is perceived as healthier and safer. Relevant scientific evidence, however, is scarce, while anecdotal reports abound. Although there is an urgent need for information related to health benefits and/or hazards of food products of both origins, generalized conclusions remain tentative in the absence of adequate comparative… 
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