Ordinality and inferential abilities of a grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

@article{Pepperberg2006OrdinalityAI,
  title={Ordinality and inferential abilities of a grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).},
  author={Irene M. Pepperberg},
  journal={Journal of comparative psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={120 3},
  pages={
          205-16
        }
}
  • I. Pepperberg
  • Published 1 August 2006
  • Computer Science
  • Journal of comparative psychology
A grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus), able to label the color of the bigger or smaller object in a pair (I. M. Pepperberg & M. V. Brezinsky, 1991), to vocally quantify < or =6 item sets (including heterogeneous subsets; I. M. Pepperberg, 1994), and separately trained to identify Arabic numerals 1-6 with the same vocal English labels but not to associate Arabic numbers with their relevant physical quantities, was shown pairs of Arabic numbers or an Arabic numeral and a set of objects and was… 

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