Orange Eyes: Bimodal Bilingualism in Hearing Adults from Deaf Families

@article{Bishop2005OrangeEB,
  title={Orange Eyes: Bimodal Bilingualism in Hearing Adults from Deaf Families},
  author={Michele Bishop and Sherry L. Hicks},
  journal={Sign Language Studies},
  year={2005},
  volume={5},
  pages={188 - 230}
}
Different aspects of bilingualism have been studied all over the world, and the studies have looked at a wide range of topics in spoken- language bilinguals such as patterns of code switching, the role of code switching in community life, the success or failure of bilingual education, second-language learning and gender, as well as many other issues focusing on single-modality bilinguals. These studies are often not applicable to studies of bimodal bilingualism, in which the subjects know a… 

Language choice in bimodal bilingual development

The results indicate that bimodal bilingual children are sensitive to the language used by their interlocutors, while showing considerable influence from the dominant community language.

The Experiences of Bilingualism Within the Deaf and the Hearing World: The Views of d/Deaf Young People

Abstract There has been increasing research that has identified the potential development for children bilingual in two languages of different modalities, such as one spoken and one signed language.

Regulation and Control: What Bimodal Bilingualism Reveals about Learning and Juggling Two Languages

In individuals who know more than one language, the languages are always active to some degree. This has consequences for language processing, but bilinguals rarely make mistakes in language

Sobreposição no desenvolvimento bilíngue bimodal

Bilingual children develop sensitivity to the language choice of their interlocutors at an early age, reflected in differential proportions of the use of each language. Factors such as discourse

Modality-(in)dependent Second Language Learning

Advances in bilingual research have brought widespread recognition that many aspects of what we previously assumed to be “typical” language development are in fact specific to monolinguals, and that

11. Modality-(in)dependent Second Language Learning

Advances in bilingual research have brought widespread recognition that many aspects of what we previously assumed to be “typical” language development are in fact specific to monolinguals, and that

Bimodal Bilingual Families: The Negotiation of Communication Practices Between Deaf Parents and Their Hearing Children

This chapter addresses the question of successful family language policy in families with deaf parents and hearing children in the United States, based on analysis of videotaped naturalistic

Bimodal bilingualism.

This work proposes a model that accounts for similarities between co-speech gesture and code-blending and assumes interactions between ASL and English Formulators, and constrain language production models by demonstrating the possibility of simultaneously selecting two lexical representations for linguistic expression and suggesting that lexical suppression is computationally more costly than lexical selection.

Bilingualism, biculturalism, and deafness

Abstract This paper contains three parts. In the first part, what it means to be bilingual in sign language and the spoken (majority) language is explained, and similarities as well as differences

Synthesis of sign and speech in a New Zealand Sign Language-target session: Oral channel variation of hearing bimodal bilingual children of Deaf parents

This thesis investigates the uniquely “bimodal” bilingual language production of some of the New Zealand Deaf community’s youngest members—hearing and cochlear-implanted Deaf children who have Deaf
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 56 REFERENCES

Bimodal bilingual language development in a hearing child of deaf parents

ABSTRACT This study examined the spoken English development of a hearing child of deaf parents who used American Sign Language (ASL). The child first learned ASL in interactions with his parents and

Bilingual signed and spoken language acquisition from birth: implications for the mechanisms underlying early bilingual language acquisition

The capacity to differentiate between two languages is well in place prior to first words, and it is hypothesized that this capacity may result from biological mechanisms that permit the discovery of early phonological representations.

Life with two languages :an introduction to bilingualism

1. Bilingualism in the World The Extent of Bilingualism National Patterns of Bilingualism Language Policy and Linguistic Minorities The Origins of Bilingualism The Outcome of Bilingualism 2.

Simultaneous Acquisition of ASL and Spoken English (in a Hearing Child of a Deaf Mother and Hearing Father): Phase I: Early Lexical Development

This study describes the linguistic development in American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English by a hearing female child whose mother is profoundly deaf and father is hearing. The data were

Acquisition of ASL and Spoken English by a Hearing Child of a Deaf Mother and a Hearing Father: Phase II, Early Combinatorial Patterns

In this second phase of a longitudinal study of the simultaneous linguistic development in ASL and spoken English by a hearing girl whose mother is profoundly deaf and father hearing, the focus is on

Code-mixing in mother-child interaction in deaf families

In this paper we discuss the mixed language input of four deaf mothers and the mixed output of their three deaf and three hearing children. Taking a strict definition of code-mixing (as defined by

The bilingualism reader

The Bilingualism Reader is the definitive reader for the study of bilingualism. Designed as an integrated and structured student resource it provides invaluable editorial material that guides the

A Case of Structural Interference across Sensory Modalities in Second-Language Learning

Victor, a biologically normal child of normal hearing and good intelligence, had almost no exposure to spoken language until he was three years old; his only language until that time was the sign

Language Contact in the American Deaf Community

Publisher Summary One of the major sociolinguistic issues in the deaf community concerns the outcome of language contact. Specifically, there exists a kind of signing that results from the contact

Communication problems in hearing children of deaf parents.

In view of the high incidence of communication problems in this population, annual audiological evaluations and counseling of deaf parents concerning aspects of hearing loss and normal language development are recommended and the problems encountered in providing therapy are discussed.
...