Orang-like manual adaptations in the fossil hominoid Hispanopithecus laietanus: first steps towards great ape suspensory behaviours

@article{Almcija2007OranglikeMA,
  title={Orang-like manual adaptations in the fossil hominoid Hispanopithecus laietanus: first steps towards great ape suspensory behaviours},
  author={Sergio Alm{\'e}cija and David M. Alba and Salvador Moy{\`a}-Sol{\`a} and Meike K{\"o}hler},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={274},
  pages={2375 - 2384}
}
Morphological and biometrical analyses of the partial hand IPS18800 of the fossil great ape Hispanopithecus laietanus (=Dryopithecus laietanus), from the Late Miocene (about 9.5 Ma) of Can Llobateres (Catalonia, Spain), reveal many similarities with extant orang-utans (Pongo). These similarities are interpreted as adaptations to below-branch suspensory behaviours, including arm-swinging and clambering/postural feeding on slender arboreal supports, due to an orang-like double-locking mechanism… 
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Morphological similarities with the Saint Gaudens specimen, together with the large body mass estimate, suggest a tentative attribution of IPS4334 to cf.
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