Oral ondansetron for gastroenteritis in a pediatric emergency department.

@article{Freedman2006OralOF,
  title={Oral ondansetron for gastroenteritis in a pediatric emergency department.},
  author={S. Freedman and M. Adler and R. Seshadri and E. Powell},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={354 16},
  pages={
          1698-705
        }
}
BACKGROUND Vomiting limits the success of oral rehydration in children with gastroenteritis. [...] Key MethodMETHODS We enrolled 215 children 6 months through 10 years of age who were treated in a pediatric emergency department for gastroenteritis and dehydration. After being randomly assigned to treatment with orally disintegrating ondansetron tablets or placebo, the children received oral-rehydration therapy according to a standardized protocol.Expand
Oral Ondansetron Administration to Dehydrated Children in Pakistan: A Randomized Clinical Trial
TLDR
Among children with gastroenteritis-associated vomiting and dehydration, oral ondansetron administration reduced vomiting and intravenous rehydration use and may be considered to promote oral re hydration therapy success among dehydrated children in low- and middle-income countries. Expand
Oral Ondansetron versus Domperidone for Acute Gastroenteritis in Pediatric Emergency Departments: Multicenter Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
In children who fail oral re hydration, a single oral dose of ondansetron reduces the need for intravenous rehydration and the percentage of children who continue to vomit, thereby facilitating the success of oral reHydration. Expand
Oral Ondansetron versus Domperidone for Acute Gastroenteritis Associated Vomiting in Young Children
TLDR
It is concluded that ondansetron is more efficacious than domperidone in cessation of vomiting associated with AGE and no or mild-to-moderate dehydration in children of age three months to five years. Expand
Single-dose Intravenous Ondansetron in Children with Gastroenteritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
In hospitalized children having gastro-enteritis associated with emesis, ondansetron is effective in the cessation of episodes of vomiting and in lowering the rates of IV rehydration, without reducing the duration of diarrhea and hospital stay. Expand
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TLDR
Ondansetron in this dose range was shown to result in a similar reduction in emesis in children with acute gastroenteritis, and higher doses were not superior to lower doses, nor were they associated with increased side effects. Expand
Metoclopramide Versus Ondansetron for the Treatment of Vomiting in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis
TLDR
In the sample size tested, intravenous metoclopramide therapy did not differ from ondansetron in the treatment of persistent vomiting for children with gastroenteritis admitted for intravenous fluid hydration. Expand
Clinical and Economic Impact of Oral Ondansetron for Vomiting in a Pediatric Emergency Department
TLDR
The administration of oral ondansetron to children with vomiting in the emergency department is clinically effective and results in significant economic savings. Expand
The role of oral ondansetron in children with vomiting as a result of acute gastritis/gastroenteritis who have failed oral rehydration therapy: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
In subjects with acute gastritis/acute gastroenteritis and mild to moderate dehydration who failed initial oral rehydration therapy, the proportion of children who received intravenous hydration was smaller in the ondansetron group than in the placebo group. Expand
Effect of Oral Ondansetron on Decreasing the Vomiting Associated with Acute Gastroenteritis in Iranian Children
TLDR
There was no significant relation between vomiting in 4 and 48 hours and need for intra venous fluid therapy between the two groups although ondansetron generally decreased ORT failure (P=0.03), and it seems that further well-conducted clinical studies are needed to determine effects of oral ondANSetron precisely. Expand
Oral Ondansetron Administration to Nondehydrated Children With Diarrhea and Associated Vomiting in Emergency Departments in Pakistan: A Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
Oral administration of a single dose of ondansetron did not result in a reduction in intravenous rehydration use, and in children without dehydration, ondANSetron does not improve clinical outcomes. Expand
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