Oral irritant properties of menthol: sensitizing and desensitizing effects of repeated application and cross-desensitization to nicotine

@article{Dessirier2001OralIP,
  title={Oral irritant properties of menthol: sensitizing and desensitizing effects of repeated application and cross-desensitization to nicotine},
  author={Jean Marc Dessirier and Michael O’mahony and Earl E. Carstens},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={2001},
  volume={73},
  pages={25-36}
}
The irritant properties of menthol and its interactions with nicotine were investigated psychophysically in human subjects. In the first experiment, 0.3% L-menthol was applied successively to one side of the tongue 10 times at a 1-min interval (30-s interstimulus interval, ISI), and subjects rated the intensity of the perceived irritation. The intensity of irritation progressively decreased across trials, consistent with desensitization. To test for cross-desensitization of nicotine-evoked… 
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Sensory Effects of Menthol and Nicotine in an E-Cigarette.
  • Kathryn Rosbrook, B. Green
  • Medicine
    Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
  • 2016
TLDR
The evidence presented here indicates that menthol can potentially improve the appeal of E-cigarettes not only via its coolness and minty flavor, but also by reducing the harshness from high concentrations of nicotine.
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