Oral Tool Use by Captive Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus)

@article{OMalley2000OralTU,
  title={Oral Tool Use by Captive Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus)},
  author={Robert C. O’Malley and William C. McGrew},
  journal={Folia Primatologica},
  year={2000},
  volume={71},
  pages={334 - 341}
}
Eight captive orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) were given wooden blocks embedded with raisins and bamboo as raw material for tool making in a study of manual laterality. In about three quarters of the raisin extraction bouts, the orangutans held the tool in the lips or teeth rather than in their hands. Three adult males and 2 adult females showed extreme (≥92%) preference for oral tool use, a subadult male and an adult female used oral tools about half the time, and 1 adult female preferred manual… 

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