Oral Prostaglandin E2 in Ductus‐dependent Pulmonary Circulation

@article{Silove1981OralPE,
  title={Oral Prostaglandin E2 in Ductus‐dependent Pulmonary Circulation},
  author={Eric D. Silove and James Y. Coe and Man Fai Shiu and J. D. Brunt and A. J. F. Page and Satinder Pal Singh and Murray D. Mitchell},
  journal={Circulation},
  year={1981},
  volume={63},
  pages={682–688}
}
Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was administered orally, in doses of 12–65, ug/kg at intervals of 1–4 hours, to 12 neonates in whom the pulmonary circulation depended on patency of the ductus arteriosus. After an oral dose, both oxygen saturation (Sao2) and plasma PGE2 concentration increased consistently within 15–30 minutes, reaching values comparable to those during i.v. infusions. Treatment continued for 5 days to 4 months. In eight infants, PGE2 withdrawal resulted in a decrease of Sao2, from a… Expand
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It is concluded that PGE1 therapy is highly effective in stabilizing pre-operative conditions of infants with ductus-dependent congenital heart disease. Expand
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Evaluation of Oral Prostaglandin E1 in Management of Ductus Dependent Congenital Heart Disease
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1128 Evaluation of Oral Prostaglandin E1 in Management of Ductus Dependent Congenital Heart Disease
TLDR
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TLDR
The data show that similarly to prostaglandin E1 infusions, prostaglandsin E2, given i.v. or orally, is useful in the management of infants with ductus-dependent cyanotic congenital heart disease and can be used for long-term, therapy being more convenient and causing minimal morbidity. Expand
Continuous Nasogastric Infusion of Prostaglandin E2 in Ductus‐Dependent Congenital Heart Disease
TLDR
Prostaglandin E2 was infused continuously through a nasogastric gavage tube in four infants with pulmonary atresia and was an effective and simple way of maintaining the ductus arteriosus open, especially for a long period of time. Expand
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TLDR
Prostaglandin E2 was given orally to 59 infants with ductus dependent congenital heart disease, and intravenous infusions were substituted for varying periods in 27 of them and growth of the infants and of their pulmonary arteries facilitated later surgical management. Expand
Pulmonary artery growth during treatment with oral prostaglandin E2 in ductus dependent cyanotic congenital heart disease.
TLDR
In patients with ductus-dependent cyanotic congenital heart disease, the prolonged use of oral prostaglandin E2 should be restricted to patients in whom the pulmonary arteries are too small to allow a palliative operation to be performed initially. Expand
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