Options for Effective Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis

@article{Bhattacharya2017OptionsFE,
  title={Options for Effective Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis},
  author={Sujit Bhattacharya and Jamal Khan and Prabhat Kumar Sinha and Sabahat Azim},
  journal={Current Treatment Options in Infectious Diseases},
  year={2017},
  volume={9},
  pages={194-199}
}
Opinion statementVisceral Leishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar, is caused by several species of Leishmania, a protozoan parasite (Leishmania donovani) transmitted to humans by the bite of infected phelobotomine argentipes sandflies. VL is a disease of poverty, affecting the poorest of the poor. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in some areas (localized). If the infection is left untreated, the patient dies in about 2 years. Several drugs are now available for the treatment… 

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